Saturday, April 17, 2010

Influence

Things have been a little quiet around here. School has hit the busy testing/research time of year, we had lots of rain, and my kids and dogs all have spring fever. So while I may not have had a chance to blog, edit, or write, I have been thinking and reading. I finished two books over the last couple of weeks that have influenced me to try something to help my own WIP.

The two books, When It Happens and Two-Way Street both have two points of view--alternating chapters with the girl and the boy. I have always been a little skeptical of multiple points of view--it can feel like head-hopping, but it worked well in both of these books. One of the strongest elements that contributed to the clarity of the narrator were that the chapter headings made it clear who it was that was talking.

These two books got me thinking that I needed to get to know my characters better by writing as if I were them. I don't think the multiple point of views will work for this WIP, but I am off to write some chapters from Daniel's point of view as a writing exercise. My editing has reached a crossroads where I really have to deepen my book and up the stakes--and who better to tell me what to do than the characters I created.

4 comments:

  1. Wonderful advice. I'm trying something new on my current WIP as well, and it's a little bit scary. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks B.J.--I hope your new adventure is going well!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Aimee! Just listened to a presentation by Jennifer Brown (author of the YA novel Hate List) at the MO Writer's Guild Conference. In the Q & A someone asked a question about multiple points of view. Her response was that when it is done well, the narrators have very distinct, rather than similar voices. I agree that this would be a fantastic writing exercise to get into your characters' heads!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hey Ruth! That's interesting to note. I think the multiple POV in those books were very controlled and the boy voice and the girl voice were very distinct. I have been a little intimidated to write as a boy--it is making me think!!

    ReplyDelete